Everything is easier in theory.

In English, we just finished reading Beloved by Toni Morrison (phenominal book). In it, there is a stream-of-consciousness section.  Every week, we have to do two journal entries: One assigned, one that we choose. Today, we wrote our own streams-of-consciousness for our assigned journal entry. 

After I got through the initial I’m-writing-with-a-blue-green-pen-because-my-purple-one-won’t-work-right thoughts, I ended up on one core idea. Because it’s in stream-of-consciousness, the grammar and punctuation are not correct.  That’s how it’s supposed to be. Here’s that part of my writing – right off the paper:

 

 

I love people. The hardest thing about people is when you have to hurt them. How do you comprimise your not wanting to hurt them with your I need to hurt them? How do you take not hurting them and the amuont you need to and take the average? When you have to tell some one something but it hurts or when you have to do something but it hurts. How has the human race lived through life? I mean, how have people not just decided to stop living? and i don’t mean suicide, I’d never, ever do that. I mean going numb or deciding other people are too much to deal with? Do things end up worth everything it takes, eventually? Everything is so much easier in theory. You say oh, I’d do this in situation X, but wwhen situation x actually happens, it starts looking and feeling like the quadratic equation. Is there a math problem that you can use to figure out what to do? Plug in the result you want for Y, plug in who your action and decision will effect for X and Z, plug in the outcome you absolutely DO NOT want as Q, plug your heart into the equation and solve it. Or would that mathmatic equation take the worth and purpose out of life? Take the trial and error and learning out of life? If we had a math problem to make our choices for us, would we stop thinking? stop feeling? stop valuing other people and start viewing them as mere variables?

 

 

 

Advertisements

Toni Morrison’s “Beloved”

 

This is a phenominal book.  Albeit very confusing the first read. Beloved is one of those books that you have to read the first time through utterly confused and lost, then the necessary second time through, you think, “Why on earth did this make absolutely no sense before?”  The third read is even better.

Beloved requires a lot of speculation and attention. It’s not a bedtime story. It does contain some adult themes, but that’s only natural – it’s a story about slavery.

“When slavery has torn apart one’s heritage, when the past is more real than the present, when the rage of a dead baby can literally rock a house, then the traditional novel is no longer an adequate instrument. And so Pulitzer Prize-winner Beloved is written in bits and images, smashed like a mirror on the floor and left for the reader to put together. In a novel that is hypnotic, beautiful, and elusive, Toni Morrison portrays the lives of Sethe, an escaped slave and mother, and those around her. There is Sixo, who “stopped speaking English because there was no future in it,” and …. Baby Suggs, who makes her living with her heart because slavery “had busted her legs, back, head, eyes, hands, kidneys, womb and tongue;” and Paul D, a man with a rusted metal box for a heart and a presence that allows women to cry. At the center is Sethe, whose story makes us think and think again about what we mean when we say we love our children or freedom. The stories circle, swim dreamily to the surface, and are suddenly clear and horrifying. Because of the extraordinary, experimental style as well as the intensity of the subject matter, what we learn from them touches at a level deeper than understanding.”  (http://www.luminarium.org/contemporary/tonimorrison/beloved.htm)

The Stream-of-consciousness section is even more baffling than te rest of the book. But if you read it with the Middle Passage in mind, it helps a lot. 

I highly reccomend this book. If any of you read it and have questions (which I know you WILL), I’ll be happy to help you understand it! Email me at shutterbug926 [at] gmail [dot] com. I love this book. I adore it.  I wrote ALL over my copy, highlighted, speculations in the margins, everything.  =]

 

Toni Morrison – “Strangers”

“The concept of what it is to be human has altered, and the word ‘truth’ needs quotation marks around it so that its absence (its elusiveness) is stronger than its presence.”

 

If you haven’t read Toni Morrison’s narration, “Strangers,” I highly recommend it. It’s brilliant. And don’t read it – or any of her writing – right before bed or in a rush or something. Take time and digest it. Get involved with it.